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Castration play

Today, I want to talk a little more about castration play. Not only that, but how we can integrate other aspects of BDSM into our pony play gelding scenes: scrotal infusion play, electric shocks, and weights. I know this doesn't appeal to everyone and many consider it edge play , but the thought of being gelded like an animal really appeals to me. There's something about being restrained like an animal, harnessed and hobbled, wearing bit and bridle, and then seeing the burdizzo or elastrator magically appear in my trainer's hand I think castration play has a natural and seamless integration with pony play most male bio-horses are geldings after all. Unless they prove themselves worthy as breeding stock, male horses are castrated. To me, the idea of having to prove my worth as a ponyboy or else find myself a gelding is surprisingly appealing. There's actually a story about this actually I'm sure there are many stories in this vein that really piqued my interest in castration play basically a guy forced to become a ponyboy; he is then forced to race other male ponies - a race in which all the losers are gelded. I've previously written a general article on castration play as well as one more specific to using an elastrator to geld a ponyboy. However, I want to be even more specific and talk about combining an elastrator with scrotal infusion and some weights for a really intense gelding experience.
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Castration also referred to as: gelding, neutering, fixing, orchiectomy , and orchidectomy is any action, surgical , chemical , or otherwise, by which a male loses the functions of the testicles. In common usage the term is usually applied to males, although as a medical term it is applied to both males and females.
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Hurst sought to get the castration bill passed during the last legislative session but failed. Robert Chesal on how Joep Dohmen uncovered the Dutch castration scandal. As to the castration of calves, it is such a simple process that it is unnecessary to say much on the subject. The castration of the galli, or priests of Cybele, is described by Dupuis. What motives led to the castration of male cattle, a practice which everywhere obviously serves agricultural purposes? He forbad the castration of males; and reduced the price of the eunuchs who were still left in the hands of the dealers in slaves. It is probable that castration may prove especially advantageous in the case of the feeble-minded. Have you mastered the meaning of phronesis? How about plethoric? Take the quiz on the words from the week of February 17 to 23 to find out.
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Castration also known as orchiectomy is any action, surgical , chemical , or otherwise, by which an individual loses use of the testicles : the male gonad. Surgical castration is bilateral orchidectomy excision of both testes , and chemical castration uses pharmaceutical drugs to deactivate the testes. Castration causes sterilization preventing the castrated person or animal from reproducing ; it also greatly reduces the production of certain hormones , such as testosterone. Surgical castration in animals is often called neutering. The term castration is sometimes also used to refer to the removal of the ovaries in the female, otherwise known as an oophorectomy or, in animals, spaying. Estrogen levels drop precipitously following oophorectomy, and long-term effects of the reduction of sex hormones are significant throughout the body. The term castration may also be sometimes used to refer to emasculation where both the testicles and the penis are removed together. In some cultures, and in some translations, no distinction is made between the two. This can cause confusion. Castration of non-human animals is intended to favor a desired development of the animal or of its habits, as an anaphrodisiac or to prevent overpopulation.

The Medieval Review Castration and Culture in the Middle Ages. Cambridge: D. Brewer, ISBN: Castration and Culture in the Middle Ages is a collection of fourteen articles, edited and introduced by Larissa Tracy, which unapologetically deals with the "conversational taboo" surrounding castration, a topic which often "elicit[s] a cringe, a grimace, [or] a protective stance" 1. Indeed it does, and it is precisely because "modern responses to castration or its threat and all the incumbent implications are not so far removed from those of earlier people" 2 that this coherent body of articles offers so much to a wide variety of scholars, graduate students, and undergraduates alike.

Chronologically, the volume covers the late Roman Republic through the early modern period, with the medieval period being the primary focus. The geographical range of Castration and Culture includes graveyards via archaeology, ancient Rome, Byzantium, England, Wales, Ireland, the Netherlands, and Viking slave routes spanning Iceland to the Islamic world.

The final six articles shift focus to the various roles castration played in medieval and early modern literature. Besides rooting their individual studies in a wealth of secondary scholarship, throughout this volume the authors explore an expansive array of sources, including but not limited to: archaeology, annals, chronicles, fabliaux, hagiographies, law codes, letters, legendaries, patristics, penitentials, plays, romances, sagas, and scripture. One of the book's greatest strengths is Tracy's engaging introduction, which provides a helpful overview of the subject and historiography pertaining to castration.

The introduction covers sub-topics such as "Castration, Sexuality, and Masculine Identity," medieval concerns about "Emasculation and Purification," the connection between "Virginity, Castration, Circumcision and the Body of Christ," as well as discussions of Peter "Abelard's Calamitous History" and of course "Castration as Punishment"--topics that several contributing authors make a point to address in the volume.

Tracy concludes the introduction by tying the articles together with a brief synopsis of each piece and how they relate to each other and to the overall subject of castration. This interconnectedness is reemphasized throughout the articles themselves, for nearly every author refers to one or more other studies--sometimes numerous times--contained in the book, both in the text and footnotes, which demonstrates that the authors took time to read one another's contributions carefully and to consider how their own work interrelates with the other articles in conjunction with the larger project.

Not all edited collections are equal in this regard. Also, this reader appreciated the book's thorough index. The book strikes a good balance between historical and literary essays and by and large follows a logical progression in presenting the articles. The first chapter in the collection sets out to raise the voices of the dead by examining the archaeology of castration. In it, Kathryn Reusch explores the physical effects of castrating prepubescent boys by examining skeletal remains of exhumed castrates.

One of her interesting points, which perhaps helps to explain the Roman fascination with eunuchs discussed in the following piece, is that due to the lack of testosterone in the developing teen body a castrate's figure develops "elongated, normally gracile, long bones" and his "cranio-facial area retains what is described as a small, child-like appearance" Reusch provides a useful overview of recent studies in the field, which literally span the globe since castration was practiced in numerous societies for thousands of years.

She also surveys a wide variety of historical and gender studies on the practice of castration and the lives of castrates. Reusch concludes with a clarion call for more digging to be done, since further archaeological contributions will expand our knowledge of the daily lives of eunuchs, including their diets, health, treatment, and status. The second essay, by Shaun Tougher, is a fascinating reassessment of how Roman people viewed and treated eunuchs, from the late Republic until the end of the Empire, when attitudes toward castration shift with the rise of Christianity which, not coincidentally, is the subject of the third article.

Tougher challenges recent scholarship, which lumps various types of castrates together and dismisses eunuchs as being perceived in antiquity negatively and in hideous terms. Such assertions, according to the author, "are in fact flawed and misleading" Tougher backs up his indictment by providing a plethora of examples--from panegyrics, poems, histories, and legal and medical texts, among others--which clearly demonstrate that Roman men prized a well-formed eunuch or better yet, whole "troupes" of eunuchs, as in the case of the emperor Titus, 63 , as passive sexual partners, and could even treat them like wives.

Nero, for example, flaunted his favorite eunuch, named Sporus, about and dressed him to look like his deceased wife. Sporus even wailed while Nero's servant helped the emperor commit suicide; Sporus soon took his own life instead of suffering the humiliation of being ravished like a maiden in a gladiatorial spectacle planned by the short-lived emperor Vitellius At the very least, Tougher makes it clear that it is inaccurate to claim that Romans viewed young castrates in the same unfavorable way that they viewed men like the Galli who chose to castrate themselves--as adults--for religious purposes.

Third, Jack Collins helps to bridge the gap from the archaeological and ancient spheres into the world of late antiquity in his exploration into how early Christians appropriated and developed castration as symbol and practice, since Jesus's comment that "there are eunuchs who have made themselves eunuchs for the sake of the kingdom of heaven" Matthew begs interpretation. Comparing Jewish and Christian approaches toward castration imagery, Collins examines the ways in which Christians interpreted castration in scripture in order to help them create a separate identity and to incorporate Jesus for their own purposes while differentiating him and his movement from that of other Jews.

This situation was complicated, moreover, because of the Greco-Roman world's conceptions of masculinity and the fear of losing one's manhood even while emulating Jesus by maintaining a celibate lifestyle. Larissa Tracy's interesting examination of the thirteenth-century South English Legendary inexplicably comes next, for the subsequent three articles chapters five, six, and seven all focus on the period between and Moreover, the hagiographical focus of her study seems more in line with the final six chapters, which concentrate on literary sources.

In any case, Tracy's article calls our attention to the glaring absence of castration in the exceptionally violent SEL. She argues convincingly that the author and compilers of the hagiography "deliberately rejected castration as a hagiographical motif in order to distance thirteenth-century England from its ruling class" 92 , which was descended largely from the Norman invaders who had imported the gruesome Scandinavian practice of blinding and castration a topic discussed in detail by Anthony Adams in chapter nine.

As such, the SEL aligns itself instead with the island's pre-Norman, Anglo-Saxon heritage in its overt rejection of punitive castration. The next three articles concentrate on castration and other forms of genital mutilation in medieval law codes. Chapter five takes us back to the Carolingian period. In it, Rolf Bremmer analyzes the treatment of castration as punishment in the Lex Frisionum c.

When castration was discussed in the laws, a distinction was made "between castration as a form of punishment and emasculation as the result of injury" As such, Bremmer divides his attention between legal treatments of punitive castration which was rarely utilized and how genital injuries are dealt with in the tariff lists and their relation to an individual's body price. In chapter six, Jay Paul Gates examines the peculiar ordering of Anglo-Saxon laws, which, when discussing the body price of an individual, progress from head to toe but conclude with a veritable laundry list of bodily injuries, including castration.

Examining castration in these codes alongside its presence in Anglo-Saxon riddles, Gates concludes that this culture was not particularly concerned with castration, per se, but more with the pragmatic functioning of the individual and how much or little they could contribute to overall society e. Chapter seven shifts us slightly to the west, where Charlene Eska explores castration in early Welsh and Irish annal accounts and legal codes which had been imposed upon them by the Norman invaders.

Eska argues that while both societies used genital mutilation in similar ways to the Normans e. In chapter eight, Mary Valante reexamines Viking raids on monasteries c. While slavery was practiced in western Europe during this period, "castration was not part of slavery" The east was a different story, however, and the Vikings knew this.

Thus, in order to increase their return, the Vikings transported or sold these boys to traders who brought them to Venice, where they were castrated in castration mills and assuming they survived the procedure were subsequently sold for a significant profit to Jewish, Byzantine and Islamic traders, who in turn sold them in the Byzantine and Muslim worlds, which treasured young, educated eunuchs to serve in the royal courts. Chapter nine continues with the Vikings, so to speak, by focusing on the Norse world through the lens of Old Norse and Icelandic literary sources.

While it was considered manly to bear scars earned in battle, it was shameful and emasculating to suffer the indignity of castration, for the loss of one's genitals transformed a man into the effeminate world inhabited by "the sexually deviant, the bestialists, the homosexuals, the priests, the sickly, the beggarly, the unfit, and the old" Literature is also the focus of the remaining five essays which examine the subject of castration in relation to medieval and early modern fabliaux, romances, poems, plays, and the like.

In chapter ten, Mary Leech explores the performance of false castration on a shrewish mother-in-law by slicing the woman's buttocks and inserting a bull testicle into each cheek and afterwards removing them in the Old French fabliau The Gelded Lady , arguing that the gender inversion serves to change the purpose of the castration performance and thus "moves the dynamic of the tale from a tale about the proper role of women to a cautionary tale for men and masculine identity" That is, quite literally: either dominate your wife or be a ball-less "man.

The Grail cycle therefore reflects the growing emphasis on a celibate clergy stemming from the papal reform movement and "a renewed interest in conceptualizing a 'non-sexual' man" In chapter twelve, Ellen Friedrich focuses on four examples of castration in consecutive versions of the thirteenth-century Romans de la rose and their relation to marginalia depicting a beaver castrating himself with its teeth, analyzing both authors' defense of castrated men such as Abelard as well as the inclusion of homoeroticism in relation to castration in the work's addition.

I look forward to assigning articles from this excellent collection in courses on the Roman Empire and the Viking Age, for example. This volume has much to offer to both the casual reader intrigued by such a provocative subject and especially historians and literary scholars interested in gender, sexuality, and ancient and medieval attitudes toward the body and what it meant to be--or not to be--a real man.

Quick jump to page content. Author Biography. Andrew Miller DePaul University.



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