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Editor's note: This interview contains a homophobic slur. Author Peggy Orenstein knows that talking to your son about sex isn't easy: "I know for a lot of parents, you would rather poke yourself in the eye with a fork than speak directly to your son about sex — and probably he would rather poke himself in the eye with a fork as well," she says. But we don't have "the luxury" to continue avoiding this conversation, she says. Orenstein spent 25 years chronicling the lives of adolescent and teen girls and never really expected to focus on boys. Orenstein notes that society doesn't often give boys "permission or space" to discuss their interior lives. Maybe that's why the young men she spoke to were so eager to open up: "When they had the chance [to talk], when somebody really gave it to them and wasn't going to be judgmental about what they had to say, they went for it. Orenstein says the boys she spoke with felt constrained by traditional notions of masculinity. One interviewee confided that he preferred to partner with girls for school projects because, "It was OK to say you didn't know what you were doing with a girl, and you couldn't do that with a guy. They saw girls as equals and deserving of their place on the playing field and in class and in leadership, and they had female friends. So that had really changed.
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By my third week of college, I was finally embracing the freedom that comes with making new friends.
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References Appendix: Other Studies in Progress. Department of Health and Human Services. The goal of the task order is to develop a working knowledge base about the use of new media such as the Internet, social networking sites, cell phones, online video games, and MP3 players among adolescents and the potential impact on their sexual activity. The literature review presented in this paper has the specific goals of 1 fostering an understanding of the types of new media available to adolescents, outlining both the platforms that adolescents use to access media and the media itself, and 2 illuminating the potential relations between new media and adolescent sexual activity. Sexual risk behavior among U. Nearly , young women aged years become pregnant in the United States each year, most of them unintentionally, 1 and half of the roughly 19 million new sexually transmitted infections STIs diagnosed each year are among to year-olds. Over the past decade, new research has identified media as having the potential to serve both roles. But the media landscape is evolving at a startling pace, and a greater diversity of content, new types of media, and new platforms for delivering media are constantly emerging. The number of television channels received in homes has moved from three to well into the three-digits, allowing youth to choose from a much wider variety of programming than in the past. The variety of content available on the Internet is practically limitless and includes what were previously considered "other media," such as music, television, games, and films.
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Revealing sexual thoughts or behaviors to the parent that might elicit criticism or punishment. In fact, sex education and parent-child communication about sexuality are associated with delayed sexual activity and more consistent contraceptive use. Parents tend to exclude positive topics associated with sexuality, such as pleasure, love, and healthy relationships, in favor of negative topics and warnings. These conversations lacking positive topics associated with sexuality, pregnancy, sexually transmitted infections STIs , and abuse and exploitation. Parental guidance is needed as adolescents develop, but parents need to have accurate and complete information from medically accurate resources to share with their teens. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of the best practices, specific tips, and resources that health care providers can use to empower parents. This article is an overview of currently understood best practices related to talking to adolescents about sexuality within the context of contemporary knowledge and broad cultural norms. For the sake of brevity, the authors describe the best practices in relation to major topics in sexuality. Some parents and teens may have discussed sexuality in the past but have not done so recently. An absence of conversation may be an indicator that it is time for parents to check in with their teen.
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Editor's note: This interview contains a homophobic slur. Author Peggy Orenstein knows that talking to your son about sex isn't easy: "I know for a lot of parents, you would rather poke yourself in the eye with a fork than speak directly to your son about sex — and probably he would rather poke himself in the eye with a fork as well," she says. But we don't have "the luxury" to continue avoiding this conversation, she says. Orenstein spent 25 years chronicling the lives of adolescent and teen girls and never really expected to focus on boys.

Orenstein notes that society doesn't often give boys "permission or space" to discuss their interior lives. Maybe that's why the young men she spoke to were so eager to open up: "When they had the chance [to talk], when somebody really gave it to them and wasn't going to be judgmental about what they had to say, they went for it.

Orenstein says the boys she spoke with felt constrained by traditional notions of masculinity. One interviewee confided that he preferred to partner with girls for school projects because, "It was OK to say you didn't know what you were doing with a girl, and you couldn't do that with a guy. They saw girls as equals and deserving of their place on the playing field and in class and in leadership, and they had female friends. So that had really changed. But I would ask them all the time to just give me a kind of lightning round of the ideal guy.

And when we would do that, it was like they were channeling It was still all about stoicism, sexual conquest, dominance, aggression — or this weird combination of being both aggressive and chill — athleticism, wealth. It was really narrow. And they would talk a lot, particularly about And a lot of guys would say to me that they had figured out They would talk about training themselves not to feel or training themselves not to cry. Boys used that word, that epithet for a gay person, a lot with each other.

But what they would say to me — this is straight boys talking — is that they would never say that to a gay person. That they had gay friends, that they weren't homophobic, but they use that word all the time. And it had become basically a slur on masculinity, not so much a statement of sexual orientation. But I think that word — that slur for gay — is what kind of draws the lines of the "man" box for boys. And it is basically the fear of being called [that] that shuts down any objection to stepping up and standing out. So it polices boys, basically.

And I also was really interested in " nohomo. Pascoe , who is a sociologist in Oregon, had done a survey of the way boys use that hashtag on Twitter. And it wasn't just a homophobic slur. It was also a protective shield that allowed them to express just really basic human ideas about affection and joy. So they would say, like, "I miss you, man.

What they're getting in porn is a really distorted vision of what human sexuality is. They see image after image of sex as something men do to women, of female pleasure as a performance for male satisfaction, of distorted bodies — of a whole lot of things that frankly wouldn't feel very good to most people. And without discussion with parents and without discussion by schools, that's becoming the de facto sex educator for a lot of kids. One thing that research shows is that [porn] actually reduces their satisfaction in their partnered relationships.

So they feel less satisfied with their partners' bodies, with their own bodies, with their own performance. So right there, something to talk to boys about is, "It's not going to be doing any favors once you get into the actual bedroom. It affects their ideas about how women should behave. It affects their ideas of what acts should be performed and the way that those acts should be performed. One of the boys [told] me that his girlfriend was a curvy African American girl, and he said that having spent hours and hours and hours looking at and reacting to what he called "all those skinny white women," that he had a hard time being aroused by her body.

And that was really disturbing him. It can mean anything. It might mean kissing. It might mean oral sex. It might mean intercourse. And, in truth, when you look into the research, about a third of college hookups fall into each of those categories.

But that ambiguity allows young people to vastly overestimate what their peers are doing. And then that can actually trigger a kind of anxiety and fear of missing out, or expectation of what you are supposed to be doing, that can make you engage in sex that maybe you don't want to have, or push harder than you might otherwise push.

On learning that gay boys are better at communicating consent than straight boys. That was something that was a big surprise and a big takeaway for me — that gay boys were so much more willing and able and capable [of negotiating] the terms of their sexual experiences with their partners. And that's partly because they sort of have to, because what's going to happen is not necessarily obvious.

But they were always so befuddled by the resistance among straight guys to doing that — if we're talking about it, it means we're going to have sex. And that's great. Why would you think that was a bad thing? If we don't talk to our kids [about sex], the media is going to educate them for us, and we are not going to love the result. What Dan Savage, who is a columnist who writes about sex talk, says is, there are four magic words that gay guys use in a sexual encounter: "What are you into?

It's not a yes or a no to a set of possibilities that is predetermined or decided by the other person, but it's a conversation. And that's ultimately what one is aiming for in this whole discussion of consent — to make sex a conversation that people can have not just for the legality of it, but so that it will be a more mutually gratifying experience for everybody involved. Sam Briger and Thea Chaloner produced and edited the audio of this interview.

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